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Twitch Cares: Mental Health Support & Information

Last Updated: Mar 07, 2018 11:04AM PST
Twitch cares. If you feel like you’re struggling, or you’ve encountered someone who you believe might self-harm or is suicidal, please contact law enforcement or a suicide hotline immediately.

Twitch Cares: Mental Health Support & Information

Twitch cares. If you feel like you’re struggling, or you’ve encountered someone who you believe might self-harm or is suicidal, please contact law enforcement or a suicide hotline immediately.

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Twitch cares. If you feel like you’re struggling, or you’ve encountered someone who you believe might self-harm or is suicidal, please contact law enforcement or a suicide hotline immediately.

I’m having thoughts about self-harm or suicide.

If you’re in immediate physical danger, please contact law enforcement or a suicide hotline immediately.

If you’re struggling, we want you to know that suicide prevention resources are available to help you. We encourage you to reach out, and talk to someone who can help.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org
1-800-273-TALK (8255)
1-800-799-4889 (for Deaf + Hard of Hearing)
838255 Text
  • We also encourage you to reach out to someone close to you. Family members, friends, and mental health professionals you may be already working with can be great resources. Reaching out with a message as simple as “I’m struggling to cope with something and I could really use your help. Are you available to help me right now?” lets them know you need someone to talk to.
  • Incorporate self care into your daily routine.
    • The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline recommends some of the following activities to help ease stress.
      • Take a walk outside
      • Write about something that you are grateful for
      • Create a playlist of music that makes you happy
      • Take a day off from social media
      • Take a hot shower or bath
      • Plan an outing with a friend
      • Compliment someone you love (you count, too!)
    • Play a game! The following games, as mentioned by Take This, are either built on evidence-based therapeutic principles or are the subject of promising research:
      • DEEP: Allow the game to sweep you into its relaxing embrace as it teaches you yogic breathing techniques that can relieve stress, anxiety and mild depression
      • Flowy: Use Flowy to breathe calmly whenever you want, wherever you are. Flowy is a mobile game being used by thousands of people to manage their panic attacks and anxiety.
      • SuperBetter: SuperBetter increases resilience – the ability to stay strong, motivated and optimistic even in the face of difficult obstacles. Playing SuperBetter makes you more capable of getting through any tough situation—and more likely to achieve the goals that matter most to you

What should I do if I see someone posting about suicide or self-harm in chat?

If you know the user personally, and you believe them to be in danger, please contact their local authorities immediately. We also encourage you to reach out to them to talk - sometimes a caring friend to let them know they have support can mean a world of difference.

If you do not believe the threat is immediate, we recommend taking the following action:

  • Share our list of resources to the user, so they can find the hotline available in their area.
    http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org
    1 800 273 TALK (8255)
    1 800 799 4889 (for deaf and hard of hearing)
    http://www.veteranscrisisline.net
    1 800 273 8255
    SMS: 838255
    http://www.thetrevorproject.org
    1 866 488 7386
    Crisis Text Line
    SMS: Text "HERE" to 741-741
    • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
    • Veteran Crisis Line (for active U.S. service members, veterans, and family members)
    • The Trevor Project (for LGBT youth, friends and family members)
  • If you feel comfortable reaching out to the user, Take This offers these tips for talking with someone who is struggling:
    • Listening Goes a Long Way — For many people in distress, lending a calm, empathic ear can make all the difference. This means listening and reflecting what you hear in an emotionally engaged manner. It requires paying attention and being present in the face of pain and discomfort without assuming you know the answer or it is your responsibility to make it “go away.”
    • Ask Questions — Don’t hesitate to seek clarification and ask for specifics when someone wants support. Try to learn more about what they mean and what made them think of a topic rather than rushing in with answers. Gentle questioning can help a friend sort out their thoughts and come to their own conclusions.
    • It Isn’t About You — It’s easy to turn away from a friend’s distress to your own experiences with seemingly similar problems. This can end up with more talking and less listening. While sometimes helpful, it is important not to assume that your experience is similar, relevant, or that what worked for you would necessarily work for a friend.
    • Don’t Be Afraid Not to Know — It can actually be comforting to someone in need to hear that you also don’t have the answer. This can legitimize discomfort and communicate an appreciation that they have good reason for what they feel. A good friend is responsible for caring, but not for fixing.
    • Withhold Judgment — Friends can sometimes see a bad decision in process and anticipate a painful outcome. A true friend offers perspective, and may have an opinion, but will support you even when you make a mistake, and won’t shower you with “I told you sos.”
    • People are Resilient — Even a struggling person has strength and resources to cope. Communicate your belief in your friend’s capacity to tolerate distress and find their way through it. Believing in someone else often helps them believe in themselves.
    • Trust your Instincts — If a friend shows signs of a serious or unremitting problem, urge them to seek professional help. A friend knows the limits of friendship and realizes they can not take ultimate responsibility for someone’s safety or well-being.

Are there resources specifically for LGBT+ users who may be struggling?

If you’ve encountered someone who you believe is suicidal, please contact law enforcement or a suicide hotline immediately

The Trevor Project is the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) young people ages 13-24. People in the US can contact by calling 1-866-488-7386 or you can learn more and find additional resources provided by The Trevor Project on their website: http://www.thetrevorproject.org/.

I need to find a suicide hotline for myself or a friend.

People are available to help if you or someone you know has thoughts of self-harm or suicide. If you’re concerned about a friend or fellow user, please courage them to reach out to any of the hotlines below.

Worldwide

Befrienders
http://www.befrienders.org
Anxiety Gaming
https://anxietygaming.com/just-vent 
International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP)
https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

United States

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org
1-800-273-TALK (8255)
1-800-799-4889 (for deaf and hard of hearing)
Veteran Crisis Line (for active U.S. service members, veterans, and family members)
http://www.veteranscrisisline.net
1-800-273-8255
SMS: 838255
The Trevor Project (for LGBT youth, friends and family members)
http://www.thetrevorproject.org
1-866-488-7386
Crisis Text Line
SMS: Text "HERE" to 741-741

Canada

Kids Help Phone (for youth under 20)
1-800-668-6868
For people over 20, find a crisis center that serves your area:
http://suicideprevention.ca/need-help
First Nations and Inuit Hope for Wellness Help Line
1-855-242-3310 (toll-free, 24 hours)

United Kingdom

Samaritans
http://www.samaritans.org
116-123
PAPYRUS Prevention of Young Suicide HOPELineUK
(professional suicide prevention service for children and young people, or anyone concerned about them)
https://www.papyrus-uk.org/
0800-068-41-41
(weekdays from 10:00 AM to 10:00 PM, weekends from 2:00 PM to 10:00 PM, and Bank Holidays from 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM)
SMS: 07786-209-697

What if I witness or believe someone is struggling from alcohol or substance abuse?

The harmful use of alcohol results in 3.3 million deaths each year, and an estimated 15.3 million people suffer from drug use disorders. It doesn’t need to be this way.

If you, someone you know, or you suspect another user, suffer with alcohol or substance abuse, there are resources available to help.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
www.samhsa.gov
1-800-622-4357 (English and Spanish)
1-800-487-4889 (TTY)

What can I do if I believe someone is suffering from an eating disorder?

Eating disorders (including as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder) consist of extreme emotions, attitudes, and behaviors surrounding weight and food issues. Eating disorders are serious emotional and physical problems that can have life-threatening consequences for both men and women.

People suffering from an eating disorder may reveal several signs and symptoms, some which can include:

  • Chronic dieting despite being hazardously underweight
  • Constant weight fluctuations
  • Obsession with calories and fat contents of food
  • Engaging in ritualistic eating patterns, such as cutting food into tiny pieces, eating alone, and/or hiding food
  • Continued fixation with food, recipes, or cooking; the individual may cook intricate meals for others but refrain from partaking
  • Depression or lethargic stage
  • Avoidance of social functions, family, and friends. May become isolated and withdrawn
  • Switching between periods of overeating and fasting

If you or someone you know, or if you suspect another user, struggles from an eating disorder, help is available.

National Eating Disorders Association
www.NationalEatingDisorders.org
1-800-931-2237

What if I believe someone is struggling with a gambling addiction?

Someone with a gambling addiction differs from a casual gambler in that they are unable to stop after hitting their “limit”, in an effort to recoup their invested money, regardless of the future consequences.

The MayoClinic lists that signs and symptoms of compulsive gambling (gambling disorder) can include:

  • Being preoccupied with gambling, such as constantly planning how to get more gambling money
  • Needing to gamble with increasing amounts of money to get the same thrill
  • Trying to control, cut back or stop gambling, without success
  • Feeling restless or irritable when you try to cut down on gambling
  • Gambling to escape problems or relieve feelings of helplessness, guilt, anxiety or depression
  • Trying to get back lost money by gambling more (chasing losses)
  • Lying to family members or others to hide the extent of your gambling
  • Jeopardizing or losing important relationships, a job, or school or work opportunities because of gambling
  • Resorting to theft or fraud to get gambling money
  • Asking others to bail you out of financial trouble because you gambled money away

If you believe someone is struggling with a gambling addiction, whether online or IRL, there are resources to help.

GamTalk
www.gamtalk.org
1-800-522-4700 (US)
1-800-633-649 (TTY)
1-866-332-2322 (Canada)
1-844-TU-VALES (Espanol)