Help Center Welcome, Guest Login

Twitch Content Sharing Guidelines

Last Updated: Nov 14, 2017 04:14PM PST
This article describes the different ways a Twitch channel owner may permit you to share such channel owner’s content on your own channel with your community.

Twitch Content Sharing Guidelines

This article describes the different ways a Twitch channel owner may permit you to share such channel owner’s content on your own channel with your community.

Notice an error or have feedback for this article? Let us know!

This article describes the different ways a Twitch channel owner may permit you to share such channel owner’s content on your own channel with your community. Nothing in these guidelines replace, supersede, or exempt users from other applicable Twitch policies, including the Terms of Service, Community Guidelines, and DMCA Guidelines.

Hosting

Host Mode allows a broadcaster to display or “host” the live stream from a hosted channel on the hosting broadcaster’s own channel. Hosting works by replacing the hosting channel’s video player with the hosted channel’s video player, while the hosting channel’s chat will stay separate and remain active.

All channels on Twitch are Hosting-enabled. Unless that account is blocking you or blocked by you, you are permitted to use Host Mode to share that content on your channel. In order to host a channel, type into your chat:

/host CHANNELNAME

For example, to share the Twitch Weekly show, you would type:

/host twitch

Read more about Host Mode.

Co-Streaming

Co-streaming allows a broadcaster to directly incorporate live content from a Twitch channel owner into the Co-streaming broadcaster’s own live Twitch content. While there are some similarities to Hosting because the original source content is being shared on the Co-streaming broadcaster’s channel, Co-streaming is different from Hosting in a few important ways:

  1. Co-Streaming must be interactive and include original commentary by you to engage your community; and
  2. the channel owner may have additional restrictions, guidelines, or requirements around Co-streaming that you must follow.

Co-streaming is not permitted by all channels, and broadcasters should refer directly to the channel page for specific permissions and restrictions. Unless otherwise noted, broadcasters must use the ‘Talk Shows’ directory for co-streaming. This applies to all ‘Always On’ channels that permit Co-streaming. In order to Co-stream a channel that permits Co-streaming, simply open the Twitch channel via the browser or Twitch app of your choosing, then capture that live stream via the same methods or tools you would use to live stream gameplay on that platform, such as OBS or XSplit in the case of PC games.

Read more about how to Broadcast.

Saving and Uploading Co-Streamed Content

Saving past broadcasts, highlights, and/or uploads of Co-streamed content is not permitted. Please refer to the Twitch Community Guidelines section on Unauthorized Content Sharing & Other Copyright Violations for more information.

Clipping

Clips allows a Twitch user to quickly capture and share fun, entertaining, and uniquely-Twitch moments from live broadcasts and VODs, while enabling broadcasters to promote and grow their channels through social sharing.

Except for a small number of select channels, all channels on Twitch permit clipping. Users may refer to the channel page for those channels that have disabled clipping. In order to make a Clip, users can simply hover or tap on the video player, then click or top the clip button. The clip can then be shared once the clips is prepared, edited, and published.

Read more about how to use clips.

Participating Channels

For reference, the list below includes ‘Always On’ and other Twitch channels where these permissions may apply. Permissions are subject to change at the discretion of the channel owner and broadcasters should refer directly to each channel page for applicable permissions and restrictions.